Google Updates to AdWords Trademark Policy To Be The Same Worldwide

Google has made a policy revision that applies to complaints we receive regarding the use of trademarks as keywords. Starting on 23 April 2013, keywords that were restricted as a result of a trademark investigation will no longer be restricted in China, Hong Kong, Macau, Taiwan, Australia, New Zealand, South Korea and Brazil.

While we will not prevent the use of trademarks as keywords in the affected regions, trademark owners will still be able to complain about the use of their trademark in ad text.

How does the revised policy affect which ads can be shown?
Google will no longer prevent advertisers from selecting a third party’s trademark as a keyword in ads targeting these regions.

Why did Google change its trademark policy?
Google’s goal is to provide our users with the most relevant information, whether from search results or advertisements, and we believe users benefit from having more choice. Our policy aims to balance the interests of users, advertisers and trademark owners, so we will continue to investigate trademark complaints concerning use of trademarks in ad text. In addition, this change means that the AdWords policy on trademarks as keywords is now harmonised throughout the world. A consistent policy and user experience worldwide benefits users, advertisers and trademark owners alike.

Does this policy change impact the usage of trademarks in ad text?
No. This policy change relates to the use of trademarked terms as keywords.

Who is affected by the policy change?
Google’s revised trademark policy applies to trademarks held in China, Hong Kong, Macau, Taiwan, Australia, New Zealand, South Korea and Brazil. This policy is already in effect in all other regions throughout world. Please consult our existing trademark policy for more information.

What will happen to existing trademark complaints?
Starting on 23 April 2013, keywords that were restricted as a result of a trademark complaint and investigation will no longer be restricted in the affected regions. If you have an existing complaint on file that includes both keywords and ad text in one of the affected regions, we will continue to restrict use of your trademark in ad text.

Will Google respond to trademark complaints in the affected regions?
Yes. With respect to the use of trademarks in ad text in the affected regions, advertisers will be able to submit trademark complaints.

What are your plans to extend this policy to additional regions?
We do not restrict trademarks as keywords in any other regions. This policy change in China, Hong Kong, Macau, Taiwan, Australia, New Zealand, South Korea and Brazil brings these countries in line with our trademark keyword policy in the rest of the world.

Will trademark terms in my account start triggering ads?
Keywords that were restricted as a result of a trademark investigation may begin triggering your ads in the affected regions, starting on 23 April 2013. If you do not want your ads to run on certain keywords, you can remove those keywords from your campaigns or add them as negative keywords.

Does this mean that I can now use trademark terms as keywords?
Google is not in a position to make recommendations regarding the use of terms corresponding to trademarks. If you have further questions, we encourage you to contact your legal counsel and consult the AdWords Terms and Conditions .

How do I change the list of those authorised to use my trademark in ad text?
If you would like to edit the list of authorised users of your trademark in your current trademark complaint, please send us a revised list. Learn more about our trademark authorisation procedure.

Who should I contact if I have further questions about this policy change?
You can email any questions you might have about the policy change to trademark-policy-revision@google.com.

Mar 21, 2013  Google Adwords Policy

SEO’s and Designer’s Ultimate Struggle to Dislike Each Other

SEOs are a unique bunch, in case you haven’t noticed. We have real OCD tendencies (and, for some us, it’s full-blown OCD), we just know better than you (about everything), we are intensely, over-the-top goal driven beings, we are scientists-in-a-vacuum, we are data-miners and data-hogs, we are behavioral futurists, and we make the web a better place for you and yours (for a price).

SEO and Designers Do Battle

As a caveat, the good ones are like that. It’s hard definitely being an SEO, as so eloquently pointed out by Portent’s own George Freitag in “Why Web Professionals Hate SEOs”. George, as a fellow SEO, you know that we are equal-opportunity haters on every other web professional too. They may hate us, but we hate them equally as much. And, really, turnabout is fair play.

After all, if designers and developers had their way, the web would be nothing but a bunch of huge, sexy images with millions of nested DIVs blended with functionality so overwhelming and powerful that it would virtually alienate anyone over the age of 35. No one would ever use the web, but the artists would have their canvas, right?
As a writer myself (by education and training), I’m all for “Ars Gratia Artis”, but that’s successful with consumers about 0% of the time. And, I won’t make excuses for Crap Hat SEOs; they’ve read three blog posts and follow “only the best search professionals on Twitter”.

Unfortunately, it’s simply comes with the territory of a profession that expanded exponentially over the last half-decade. Professional SEOs will always be lumped in with them and have to fight their battles and over-reaches.

The Brave New World Isn’t So Brave. Or New.
Google’s Panda and Penguin didn’t change the game. It just made the rules a lot more evident to those who thought there were no rules. Those SEOs who knew the score long before Google had to put down a heavy hand, have come through unscathed nearly 2 years later.

Designers and developers just kept on polluting the web with “beautiful, functional” brand sites. But, when the Piper comes calling, and accounts are stake, it is really strange how those same developers and designers suddenly are “eager” to work with SEOs.

SEO is the Thing
Unless you’re Coca-Cola or another one of the Fortune 50, unbranded search is how people are going to find you. Sorry, but them’s the facts.
So, while designers and developers have thousands of things to contemplate (how to make the brand logo “pop” or make a cart add products), SEOs are contemplating the strategy and schema, from content to information architecture to technical foundation to link graphs and the multitude of things each encapsulates.

Each and every one of those things matter in the quest for findability. Is there any sense in making a brand logo visible if no one is going to be there to see it? Or, a cart that will make you a ham sandwich after you finish the purchase, if no one is there to use it? Instead of treating SEOs as a nuisance and as someone who’s only trying to impede your progress, you might actually find that we can make your job easier in the end.

Jack of All, Master of None
The fact that I can’t write an entire array or code in extensive JavaScript, doesn’t mean that I don’t know enough to be dangerous. And, it also doesn’t mean that I can’t see the Charlie-Foxtrot of spaghetti code your writing that’s going to make my life a nightmare in two months.

The countless duplicate pages you’re making every single time a user uses your product filters, or how you wrapped all those reviews in an I-Frame instead of attempting to take the extra hour or two to use the API, or that mistake you made by mistyping the page name and just created a new one. Yeah, I found that too.

Those things have a big effect on a site authority and trust. Also, don’t let the fact that I can’t create a CSS sprite on my own, fool you into thinking I don’t know how to create a cascading style sheet and know how they work.

SEOs (the good ones) know enough to intervene when it looks like a disaster-in-the-making and will end up as a dumpster-fire for search in two months. You may not care, but just remember, we’re ones that are accountable for “success” at the end of the day. You know, the “hard metrics” that clients need before renewing an engagement.
Here again, the professional SEOs know exactly what we are asking for when we ask for it. Most will actually hate asking you do it because we know how much time is involved and the rework we’re causing. But, in the end, we’re helping you to build a better site for the consumer and site that gets found in the SERPs.

We Don’t Know The Entire Algorithm, But We Know Enough
My guess is that not even Matt Cutts is clued into the ENTIRE Google algorithm, and that guy is the Head of Search Spam at Google and (un)official Google-SEO spokesman.
Being a jackass and claiming that I don’t know the entire algorithm simply tells me you’re a defensive person (and possibly a lazy one too). We know enough factors of the algorithm, and whether they have a positive or negative effect, on a website that the changes we ask for have a purpose.

If not knowing the entire algorithm is cause for loss of credibility for an SEO in the eyes of a designer, then that can be transposed to a designer not have full knowledge of Nielsen’s Heuristics Evaluation. Moreover, I’ve never heard anyone say, “Cause’ the algorithm, dude!” Just doesn’t happen. And, if it does happen, point in the direction of said person(s), we’ll have a chat.

SEOs will fully explain these things to you if you have the time. Seriously. Ask a question about why or how this is going to affect the website or search engine indexation. Any SEO (the good ones) will be more than happy to walk you through why it matters and why it should be the way we need it.

How Designers, Developers, and Copywriters Can Ease the Pain
Short of locking you in a room and playing professor for a few days straight, the best way, as George points out, is to communicate. That word makes it sound easy and effortless, but it’s anything but. When you’re under deadlines and shuffling between projects, ain’t nobody got time for that.

The real key is to sit down next to that SEO (that’s right, put down the email and step away) and let them walk you through it. Sure, it’s 10-20 minutes out of your day, but when you can see it from their point of view as they walk through your code or design, it breaks down barriers that email can’t. It’s that human element. It may not solve the issue, but it will help both parties gain a healthy respect for one another.

And, that’s first step to compromise. SEOs, as much as we know we need it our way because it’s right, we have to be willing to step down off the soapbox. You have to be willing to capitulate some things in order to get the bigger win for search. You may not be able to get that direct 301 you need on duplicate content, but with communication, explanation, compromise, you can convince that developer to work in a rel=canonical.
SEOs need to be able to compromise, just as developers, designers, and copywriters need to be able to learn to compromise. Because at the end of day, it’s about creating wins for the client not for own egos.

Written by Anthony Verre
Hate Web Professionals (Mostly)

It takes at least 10,000 hours (5 Years) of dedicated practice in a given field or area of expertise allows a person to become truly “expert”.

Having years (and thousands of hours) of dedicated focus and practice within a specific niche is obviously highly valuable and allows a person to have a unique, proprietary perspective on that niche (and usually highly valuable expertise). But how many hours is “enough” to achieve expertise status? One take on the subject we (and many others) found interesting was Malcolm Gladwell’s in the book Outliers where he popularized the theory that 10,000 hours of dedicated practice in a given field or area of expertise allows a person to become truly “expert”.

10,000 rule of hours practiced to claim to be an expert

5 Reasons to Diversify Your Search Strategy with PPC Advertising

By Elisa Gabbert
July 18, 2012

Yesterday we published the results of a study showing how sponsored advertisements on Google (PPC ads) are taking over territory previously reserved for organic listings, AKA “free clicks.” This is both good news and bad news for marketers. On the plus side, Google continues to roll out more and better types of search advertising to help marketers target their customers. On the negative side, you (obviously) have to pay for those clicks.

But the fact is, organic clicks aren’t really “free” either – gone are the days when it was relatively easy to rank on the first page in Google for your target keywords. Given the increasing costs and complications involved with SEO, it’s important to diversify your marketing channels. You can’t rely on organic search alone for traffic and leads – you never know when the next big algorithm update is going to murder your rankings.

Here are five reasons to shift some of the time and budget you spend on SEO to PPC.

#1: For Commercial Queries, Paid Clicks Outnumber Organic Clicks By Nearly 2 to 1

Organic clicks still account for more clicks overall in the search results – but different types of keywords have different value to businesses. For search queries that show high commercial intent – i.e., they indicate that the person searching wants to purchase something – more and more of the page (85% of above-the-fold pixels!) is devoted to sponsored listings. The organic results for transactional keywords like “best email software” or “waterproof digital camera” are mostly pushed below the fold. The top 3 ad spots for a commercial query take 41% of the clicks, and the Product Ad Listings take another 20%. Overall, sponsored results account for 65% of clicks on these keywords, compared to 35% for organic results.

#2: Google’s Sponsored Ad Formats Keep Getting Better

You have minimal control over how your organic search listings appear in Google. (For example, they’ve recently started applying new titles, when they think they can serve up a better one than the title you put on the page.) But you have lots of attractive choices when it comes to ad types. Here are just a few of the ad options that Google now offers:

Mega Site Links: This huge ad format offers up to 10 additional places to click, greatly increasing your chances of presenting a relevant link.Remarketing: Remarketing or retargeting allows you to track site visitors with a cookie and chase them around the Web, displaying relevant banner ads until they click and convert.Social Ad Extensions: With social extensions you can display who has +1’d your site, lending credibility and potential name recognition – it also makes your ad look less like an ad (see below).

#3: About Half Your Audience Can’t Tell the Difference Between Paid and Organic Search

A lot of people think that “nobody clicks on Google ads.” And it’s true that eye tracking studies suggest most people ignore the sponsored ads in the right column. However, one study showed that about half of people don’t recognize the ads above the search results as ads – in other words, they couldn’t tell the difference between the organic and paid results.

Top ads get clicked first whether paid or organic

Top ads get clicked first whether paid or organic

If users don’t know your ad is an ad, they can’t be suspicious of its intent – and why should they be, if it gives them what they want? Secure one of those coveted positions above the organic results for a commercial query, you’ll take the lion’s share of clicks without sacrificing trust with users.

#4: SEO Is a Full-Time Job – Or Several Full-Time Jobs

As the number of sites competing for rankings has sky-rocketed, Google’s algorithms have gotten more and more complex, and it’s become much harder to achieve – and maintain – high rankings in the organic results. Where in the past businesses could get away with hiring a single SEO point person (usually a pretty junior position), now it often requires a full team to develop and execute on an SEO strategy (a content writer, a link builder, etc.). We believe that PPC – once your campaigns are set up and running – requires significantly less time to manage. According to Perry Marshall, author of The Ultimate Guide to Google AdWords, “if you focus on the areas that bring the most traffic, I find that once you find a rhythm, you can really do this with a few minutes a day, at most a few hours a week, and that’s with a large campaign with a $10,000+ spend per month.”

#5: Algorithm Updates Don’t Affect Your PPC

Google’s rolling algorithm updates ensure that SEO gets harder and more confusing over time. The Panda and Penguin updates in particular have addressed the kind of “optimizations” that have tended to work for site owners and marketers in the past. The only way to find out if Google thinks your SEO techniques are over the line (AKA “over-optimization”) is to take a hit on rankings, and then scramble to figure out – and fix – what you’ve been doing wrong. Google does suspend AdWords accounts on occasion, sometimes without clear reason, but in PPC you’re much less likely to experience major flux or drop-offs in rankings and traffics due to changes on Google’s end.

These are all good reasons to re-allocate some of your marketing budget to PPC, if you’ve been depending on SEO for traffic and lead generation. We would never advocate giving up on SEO – you won’t hear us saying “SEO is dead” anytime soon. But strive for a balance between your search marketing channels, and you can minimize the damage incurred as SEO gets incrementally harder.